Baap bada na bhaiya, sabse bada rupaiya! 30th of October is celebrated as World Thrift Day or World Savings Day. This day aims at encouraging people to save money or devote to savings. On this day, we have listed down some pocket-friendly markets in Mumbai that you can go shopping while saving your money.

World Thrift Day was established by Italian Professor Filippo Ravizza in the International Savings Bank Congress in order to encourage and promote the idea and practice of savings. While savings may not always be as easy as it seems, you can certainly make sure you don’t overspend. We’d all agree with the fact that the one thing that takes up or hinders our process of savings is ‘Shopping’. Do you know what makes the whole shopping experience better and worthy? The amount of money you save on it. It is, in fact, the sole idea of people eagerly waiting for offers and discounts. On this day, here is a list of pocket-friendly markets in Mumbai that sell cheap products helping people contribute to their savings (or at least not feel bad about spending).

Check out this list of pocket-friendly markets in Mumbai:

Colaba Causeway

Fashion street

Natraj market

Crawford market

Also Read: 13 Shopping Markets in Delhi that are heaven for affordable shopping

Chor bazaar

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And sometimes, we find a portal. We step through it, and we’re transported to a different time in a different place. . ‘Bhaiya, Chor Bazaar ke entrance pe chhod deejiye.’ ‘Haan madam, aap yahin se andar jaa sakte hai.’ (‘Pls drop me at the entrance to Chor Bazaar.’ ‘Madam, this is the entrance.’) . I looked at the alley my cabbie pointed towards. A dilapidated lane looked back at me, crumbling store facades and all, a lane which I would steer clear of if I didn’t know what was in there. But now, I was alive with curiosity and was looking at it with different eyes. I started walking, and each step I took led me further away from the cacophony and rush on the street I’d alighted at, and into a sepia-hued world which was just waking up. I walked past two men who were busying themselves with dismantling a car, breaking it down piece by piece. A stray chicken wound its way around my legs and fluttered away. I could hear the distant bleating of goats, and an occasional rumble of a bike passing through. The streets grew narrower, and the Mumbai I’m used to faded away as I entered the Bombay of yore, the one with the fabled ‘old-world charm’. . Mutton Street is home to the famous Chor Bazaar, one of the oldest flea markets in Mumbai. It was earlier known as ‘Shor Bazaar’, translating to ‘noisy street’, but it was constantly mispronounced by the British, and so the name stuck. And in keeping with its name, Chor Bazaar is home to a lot of stolen goods which find their way here from, well, who knows where? You’ll find literally anything here. Electronics, hardware, spare parts (car being broken down, remember?), clothing, antiques, furniture, trunks, ornaments, gramophones, you name it. I found this shop called ‘Little Stuff’. It’s a tiny, tiny little store, but is packed to the rafters with a variety of bric-a-brac – vessels, musical instruments, ornaments.. What caught my eye was a pair of ghungroos, which took me right back to my dance days! 😊 . My tryst with Chor Bazaar was short this time, but it doesn’t take long to sense the vibe here, nor to realise that there are stories here from a time we don’t know of. And for those, I’ll be back 😊

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Linking road

Hill road

Lamington road

Have you ever shopped at any of these pocket-friendly markets? Tell us in the comments below.

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Smrithi Mohan
A girl in her 20s, my name is Smrithi Mohan a south-Indian with a ‘hetchu’. I’m from Kerala and I’m not a Madrasi. Blue sky, books and chai excite me. I can find humour in the smallest thing and as Chandler says, “I am not good at advice, but I can interest you with a sarcastic comment”.