A chick flick with a predictable feel-good end, Like a Boss, is something you’d enjoy watching if you keep logic aside for a while.

Directed by Miguel Arteta, this run-of-the-mill movie tells the story of two friends navigating their way through adult problems in the middle of a half-baked plot, one that makes no sense in the real world.

Cast Tiffany Haddish plays the role of Mia Carter and Rose Byrne plays the role of Mel Paige. The two of them have natural chemistry onscreen and we’d love to root for them if only their individual stories were given importance in the film. Besides a couple of references in the movie, we have no idea about who Mia and Mel are as people. Their relationship is rather sweet and reminds you of every chick flick ever. Mel Paige is a massive people pleaser who is afraid of confrontation, and very concerned with what the world thinks of her. Sounds too close to home, eh? Salma Hayek plays the role of Claire Luna, a cartoon character for an anti-hero. In an age where even villains from cartoons have a back story, Claire Luna as Salma Hayek is terribly underutilized in ‘Like a Boss’ with absolutely no back story and just a bitchy personality that doesn’t even come all the way through.

Storyline – Like a Boss is the story of two best friends, Mia and Mel who’ve been friends since middle school and started a business together in a garage. Twenty years later, they’re co-founders of a cosmetic company that is almost bankrupt. Enter Claire Luna, a business tycoon who makes them a proposal that ends up testing their life-long friendship. What follows is a series of chick flick cliches with a feel-good end!

Watch the trailer here!

What I liked – It’s a fun movie to watch if all you’re looking for is a chick flick with a happy ending. This movie promotes the idea of a beauty brand wanting to put the right message across via their products and not too many films cover that. Interracial close friendships, ethics in business, navigating through adult friendships, and open communication; it’s nice to watch these concepts come alive onscreen.

What I didn’t quite like – As promising as the trailer looked, the movie did absolutely no justice to it. Salma Hayek wasn’t used to her full potential, instead, all she was portrayed as was an insecure makeup mogul used for comic relief. There’s been little to no backstory about her or our two protagonists. I’m not sure which multi-millionaire goes out of her way to destroy a start-up, only to create a rift between two business partners. Also, I don’t think adults convince each other to take massive business decisions by singing karaoke together or add extra chilies out of spite. This isn’t 2004!

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