Based on a real story, The Blue Miracle tells a beautiful tale of hope, family, and putting one foot forward every day.

No matter how many feel-good movies I’ve watched, there’s always space for one more. Can you really blame me? With everything going on in the world around us, COVID-19, doctors being beaten up, cyclones, who wouldn’t want to watch something that leaves them feeling comforted? As much as I love my share of unpredictable drama, I like watching predictable movies that have happy endings. And who’s to say that happy endings aren’t real? The Blue Miracle on Netflix is based on a real story about a father entering the world’s highest-paying fishing competition to save his orphanage.

Cast – Jimmy Gonzales as Omar aka Papa Omar holds this movie together with his portrayal of the father who’s willing to overcome his fears to save Casa Hogar. I love Steve Gutierrez as Tweety who constantly runs away from the orphanage hoping that his mother will return. Dennis Quaid plays the role of Wade, a stereotypical and arrogant captain who has no patience and is perpetually angry.

Storyline – The film follows a former street child Omar, who runs a poorly funded orphanage in Cabo, Mexico. Omar has a recurring nightmare from the first time he went fishing with his dad and this moment is replayed beautifully throughout the film, with hues of blue and his silent cry for help. Papa Omar as the kids call him enters the world’s highest-paying fishing competition with his band of boys in an effort to save Casa Hogar when the local bank sends multiple notices. Two-time winner of Bisbee’s Black & Blue Fishing Tournament, Wade agrees to take team Casa Hogar onboard. Tweety’s child-like innocence and belief that his prayers will be answered rubs on to Papa Omar in the end.

What I love – The Blue Miracle isn’t a very serious film even though it touches upon the violence, death, and poverty in Mexico. The vibrant colors and background score give the movie an artistic vibe. Hanan Townshend and Cardec Drums have done such a good job with the background score throughout this film. Hues of blue are prominent throughout the film, same with Omar‘s flashback of drowning in the sea and losing his father. The same source of water that took his father’s life, allowed him to save his home from shutting down, I love that symbolism.

Watch the trailer here.

What I didn’t like – The ending where Omar looks like he’s giving birth to the blue marlin felt a tad too over dramatic.

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